How to help kids recognise their feelings: Free activity sheet

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We have been sharing with you some of the fabulous mindfulness resources from Upside Down Books on KiddyCharts. Today, we have another book to share with you, alongside an activity from it; It’ll be OK, beautifully illustrated by Josephine Dellow. This book is focused on helping kids to understand and acknowledge their feelings, and the today we are sharing a how to help kids recognise their feelings activity sheet. This resource comes from the book, and is invaluable for both parents and educators in starting the conversation with kids aged 5 to 8 (ideally) about their feelings.

This activity is focused on helping kids to name, and recognise the feelings that they have, as well as accepting that is really is OK to have less positive thoughts. Everyone has moments where they don’t feel so good; we almost have to experience the lows, so we can register the highs.

Mega Match up feelings activity sheet

This is a beautifully illustrated activity sheet, with the idea that children match up the emotion, with the facial expression and the body language for that feeling.

Children need to draw the lines from the name of the emotion to the face that is showing that emotion, and finally to the child that is showing their their body that they are experiencing that emotion.

The activity sheet can be used to start a conversation around those feelings too:

  • What has made you feel excited recently?
  • Have you felt sad at all today?
  • What might you do if you knew one of your friends was sad?
  • What makes you angry?
  • What do you do when you are angry?

Expressing emotions is complex when you are as young as 5, and can even be difficult for adults. Sometimes even the mere act of naming a negative emotion can help children to feel that they have a little more power over that feeling. This is a first step to helping children to be more in control of their emotions, and less likely to suffer from anxiety.

As with the whole book, naming emotions also helps children to acknowledge that it is OK to feel both happy and sad in our lives too. Just so long as that feeling of sadness doesn’t become over-whelming and start to have a profound effect on other aspects of our lives, such as our ability to make friends, or join in with activities.

To download the activity sheet – all you need to do is click on the square image below as always.

Do pop over to Amazon and check out the It’ll Be OK book in full, as there are loads of great activities and over 100 stickers to help kids in it. The illustrations really help bring the activities to life, and its focus on helping younger children learn from an early age how to understand and process their feelings is incredibly important.

RRP £7.99

You may have spotted how important we think mindfulness for kids is; so we have a few other activities focused on this within the site. Here are a selection, but do check out as many of them as you can.

Mindfulness activity sheets for kids

We have a few activity sheets from Upside Down Books on the site - take a look at these, but search Mindfulness on KiddyCharts, or choose the heading from the Menu above to explore more.

Mindfulness resources are available outside our site to of course:

Mindful activities for kids from other sites

Here are a few more ideas for you about mindful activities that your kids can do today.

We hope that you have had fun with this activity sheet, do keep coming back for more. Why not subscribe to our weekly newsletter?

Cheers for coming!

Helen

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