There is always an increased risk of children getting burnt on Bonfire Night – kids can easily get over excited and run around, getting too close to the fire which is a potentially dangerous situation of course. Burns are horrible and the pain and damage caused can be devastating. Knowing what to do if this should happen can make a massive difference in reducing the amount of pain and scarring and may avoid them having any tissue damage at all. A hot drink that was made nearly 10 minutes ago can still be hot enough to scald a baby.

hands of women helps child to washes his hands

For TREATING BURNS – TREAT THEM IMMEDIATELY WITH COOL RUNNING WATER

  • Immediately, but extremely carefully remove loose clothing covering the burn

DO NOT TAKE CLOTHES OFF IF THERE IS ANY RISK THAT THE SKIN HAS STUCK TO THEM OR IF THE SKIN HAS BLISTERED. Clothes often melt, sticking to the skin.

  • Hold the affected area under cool running water for at least 10 minutes
  • Reassure the child and keep them warm and dry. Be aware of any signs of clinical shock
  • Phone an ambulance; particularly if a large area is affected, if the skin is broken or blistered, or if they show signs of shock and keep the area under cool running water whilst you are waiting for the ambulance.
  • Never touch the burn, pop blisters, or put on any creams whatsoever.

Take burns very seriously and always seek medical advice.

  • If your child is on fire – Stop, Drop and roll them to put the flames out
  • Always get a medical professional to assess a burn.

It can be a scary time when your child has been burn, but the most important thing is to try and stay as calm as you can for them; the calmer you are, the more likely you will make those all important decisions in the first few moments after the burn/scalding event.